Is it just me?

Yeah, why would they?

When a group like Invisible Children launch an online campaign that ignites teenagers to think of a cause outside of their Facebook stream, they face criticism “…for not spending enough directly on the people it intends to help and for oversimplifying the 26-year-old conflict involving the LRA and its leader, Kony, a bush fighter wanted by the International Criminal Court for crimes against humanity.” Read more: http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2109711,00.html#ixzz1rddVuoy9

The narrator of their video, Jason Russell, suffered a psychotic episode, with this explanation offered from his wife, Danica Russell.

“Doctors say this is a common experience given the great mental, emotional and physical shock his body has gone through in these last two weeks. Even for us, it’s hard to understand the sudden transition from relative anonymity to worldwide attention — both raves and ridicules, in a matter of days,” Read more: http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2109711,00.html#ixzz1rde5gjQa

Meanwhile, Kevin Systrom, founder of Instagram, a marketer who learned to code at night, has had this said about him on a TNW post.

Instagram‘s CEO, Kevin Systrom, will go down in history as one of the greatest Silicon Valley success stories of our generation.

Is it just me, or does the world seemed skewed? When people trying to do something to make the world better receive criticism, and people who make a photo sharing app are lauded as success stories, then I think we need to do some re-evaluation of our priorities.

But maybe that’s just me.

5 Comments

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5 responses to “Is it just me?

  1. The mass media cultivate a black/white, either/or world because presenting the world that way doesn’t require much thinking and it invites others to respond emotionally rather than thoughtfully. I guess in a connected world all this is greatly magnified, but it’s an old, old human trait. Evolve!

  2. dskmag

    It is screwed. Increasingly, the social-coverage of ‘what’s happening’, which was supposedly going to disintermediate the middlemen is now creating more of them. Disintermediation, widely seen as what the Internet does to every business, art and profession – eroding the traditional power of institutions hasn’t yet enabed the populus to run their own affairs or allow those who plow time and effort into good-cause-ideas to florish – unless you have a user-base of 30 million.

    It appears to me, that there is now a less than useful embedded culture, that people are pre-occupied with their own commercial aganda, as though they are the peak paternalistic editorial body to feed the rest of the most healthy diet or what is true and real that we should be buying into.

    http://boingboing.net/2012/04/09/9-year-olds-diy-cardboard-ar.html – this is a good example of a dad supporting a kid, and a kid leading ideas. I am increasingly suspicious of people who manipulate other people’s ‘world view’ – and Instagram is perhaps a great example of exploting the good will of people (the app would be nothing without people’s creativity) with zero consultation with its community. Worse still, Facebook owns the copyright on things posted to it. I don’t think it’s you, it’s probably me too.

  3. Angela

    It isn’t just you. Sigh……

  4. You are entirely correct. That purchase of Instagram was obscene. That money should have been spent on something worthy. The world has changed, at least aspects of the modern consumerist world, for the worst.

    Many are trapped in this compulsive desire to acquire and update technology. Even I to some extent. At least I still have my turntable and radio from the 1970s.

    The world is screwed. I am in the midst of re-evaluting my values. Time for another watershed methinks.

  5. Hi, my name is Rosemary Catlin, and I’m a student in EDM 310 at the University of South Alabama. I will be commenting on one more of your posts after this, and then I will provide a summary of both posts on my own blog. It’s definitely not just you. The world has changed so much over the years. The significance we place on such insignificant things is appalling. Children, especially, need to grow up learning what is truly important so no matter what we can never give up. We have to push through the criticism and just try our hardest to change what the world views as important. Easy, right?

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