An observation

I’m on school holidays at the moment, and loving every minute of it I don’t mind saying. It’s a time to catch up on things, like appointments for your kids that you can’t schedule in school term time because you’re working and are committed to the work you do, and you feel guilty if you take a day off to do something like visit the dentist. So instead, you pack your holiday breaks full of appointments like this, and your kids appreciate the fact that you care for them. : )

(For the record, I just have to admit that this backfired for me when I booked an appointment for my daughter, only to have the dental clinic claim no knowledge of this  so I have had to schedule an in term appointment- at the end of a school day – of course!)

I was at one such dental appointment with my son the other day, and found myself struck by the changing nature of dental practice. The dental assistant was recording the state of my son’s teeth via a computer program, and the dental tools were all hygienically sealed before they were used. Most of what needed to be done was preventative work; seals on teeth and the like, things that were unheard of in my youth when I was subject to amalgam filling after amalgam filling, and root canal treatment. It was pretty obvious that the dental profession has moved a long way in recent years.

While I sat there and took it in, I thought about resistance to change many of us encounter in education. Can other professions resist change as much as some educators do? I’ve heard the following stated many times before, but it’s so true. We wouldn’t tolerate the people looking after our health to not be up to date with current thinking, so why do we tolerate educators not being up to speed with current ideas about educational practice?